Category Archives: Connecticut Carpentry Repairs

How to replace a concrete pier to prevent wood rot – Connecticut

This is the last of a 2-part amateur demonstration of how I replaced a post that was rotted out from underground moisture. After removing the old post I modified the concrete pier so that the wood will be entirely above grade. This video is a good demonstration of what happens when wood supporting posts are sunk below ground level. Before doing any home renovations, be sure you have read and understood your risk and responsibility. Specifically you need to understand whether your local building code requires a building permit, and you should inquire from local building inspection services whether additional work is required. Any misadventure you encounter if you decide to repair your home is your responsibility.

How to replace a load bearing post – Connecticut

This video is part 1 of a two-part series where I demonstrate how I replaced a load-bearing post and modified the concrete supporting pier to help prevent future wood rot. The demonstration is an amateur effort, published for entertainment purposes only. It serves as a good example regarding why it is unwise to bury any wood foundation below or even near ground level. Before doing any home renovations, be sure you have read and understood your risk and responsibility. Specifically you need to understand whether your local building code requires a building permit, and you should inquire from local building inspection services whether additional work is required. Any misadventure you encounter if you decide to repair your home is your responsibility.

How To Fix Gouges, Dents, And Deep Scratches In Hardwood Floors – Connecticut

In this video, I show you how to fix gouges, dents, and deep scratches in hardwood floors. These imperfections can take over your hardwood, and can be easily fixed with some wood filler, a putty knife, some sandpaper, and a damp cloth! I show you exactly how to get rid of those imperfections in your hardwood.

12 Tools Every Carpenter Needs – Connecticut

 

 

 

Putting together a comprehensive set of carpentry tools can be a lifetime’s work. With each new job you tackle you find you could do with just that one extra tool. As your abilities as a carpenter grows you take on more challenges and of course they require…more tools. But if you’re just starting out and you want to gather together a few essentials that will come in useful for most carpentry projects. #1Tool Belt For ease of use when actually working on a project, you can’t beat a tool belt. Buy one that will accommodate the tools you use most often. Models to which you can add extra pouches for more specialised tools extend flexibility. Hammer Bashing away at things is part of the fun of carpentry — don’t deny yourself. If you intend to do heavy work you’ll need the grunt of a 20 oz. framing hammer. I prefer the framing hammer by Estwing. Tape Measure Without some way to measure out your projects you might as well not even start. Tape measures aren’t expensive. You want the retractable metal sort. I prefer a 25′ to 30″ carpenters tape by Stanley tools. Squares If a carpentry project isn’t true and square it will probably be impossible to complete. And if you do get it finished, it’ll almost certainly fall not reflect well on your character. Two types of square invaluable in the squaring process are a large L-shaped carpenter square and a smaller, triangular speed square. I recommend you purchase both. Spirit Levels For any sort of construction work you’ll need a spirit level. The larger the scale of the project, the larger the level needed. A small torpedo model will suit most needs around the home. For larger framing tasks I recommend a 4 ft level. Utility Knife Otherwise known as a Stanley knife, this tool has a thousand uses, from cutting drywall to trimming pencils. Keep one in your toolkit and make sure you have extra blades stored inside the utility knife. Marking Tools You’ll need a carpenter’s pencil to mark your cuts and layout. Saw Carpentry without a saw? Impossible, unless you work only putting together IKEA furniture. You could buy a crosscut saw to cut against the grain, a rip saw to cut along the grain and a panel saw for finer work. But for a basic tool kit, just go with a universal saw. I recommend a Stanley Fat Max carpenters saw. Screwdrivers I recommend a basic combination screwdriver. Home depot sells a nice unit by Buck.

How to Repair a Scratch on a Stained Wood Kitchen Cabinet : Woodwork & Carpentry – Connecticut

Repairing a scratch on a stained wood kitchen cabinet is something that you can do with a sponge and other tools. Repair a scratch on a stained wood kitchen cabinet with help from a foreman for Lighty Contractors in this free video clip. Expert: Joshua Clement Filmmaker: Nathanael Rittichier Series Description: Working with wood in your home will require you to always take the properties of the specific type of wood into consideration. Get tips on carpentry with help from a foreman for Lighty Contractors in this free video series.

How to Repair Squeaky Floors Through Carpeting – This Old House – Connecticut

Shopping List for How to Repair Squeaky Floors Through Carpeting: – Squeeeeek No More® floor repair kit More info available at www.squeaknomore.com Tools for How to Repair Squeaky Floors Through Carpeting: – drill/driver, used to drive specialty screws through carpet and into joists – hammer, used to locate floor joists

How to Repair Squeaky Wood Floors – This Old House – Connecticut

This Old House general contractor Tom Silva silences some squeaky floors. (See below for a shopping list and tools.) Full episode: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z6KEm… How to Repair Squeaky Floors Through Carpeting: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4gUW-… How to Strip a Hardwood Floor: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2SVs1… How to Refinish Hardwood Floors: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qO12o… Shopping List for How to Repair Squeaky Wood Floors: – 2-inch (6d) finishing nails – counter-Snap breakaway screws – wood filler stick Tools for How to Repair Squeaky Wood Floors: – drill/driver fitted with ⅛-inch-diameter drill bit

How to repair your floorboards | Help & Advice | DIY at B&Q – Connecticut

How to repair your floorboards Featured Timber & Woodwork Introduction As time goes on; your floorboards might start needing a bit of care and attention. If they’ve dried out or worked loose from their fittings, they could have started to creak. And if they’ve split, warped, shrunk or broken, you may need to replace them completely. Alternatively, you could have to lift some boards to reach cables or pipes that run underneath. How you do this depends on whether your floor is made of tongue-and-groove boards (which are slotted together before being nailed to the joists) or square-edged boards (which are simply butted together). Whether you want to repair or replace your boards, here are some helpful hints on how to do so. It’s also worth remembering that floor coverings can hide a multitude of sins. So if you’ve taken up your carpet to sand and seal your wooden floor, check for loose boards before you start the job. Tools & materials required expanded,How to fix creaking floorboards The reason floorboards become creaky is because their fixing nails get loose and the board isn’t firmly attached any more. There are two ways to fix them depending on their condition. If the floorboard is in good condition, you can take out the nails and screw it down using the existing nail holes. If it’s badly damaged at the sides and corners, you’ll need to make new holes for the screws. But before you start drilling, do make sure you lift the board and check for pipes and cables. Step 1 You’ll need to find which part of the floorboard is loose by walking over it and seeing where it moves. If the board is damaged and you can’t re-nail in the old holes, you’ll have to take the nails out with pincers and then lift the board to check for cables and pipes. Mark any you find on the board in pencil to show where they should go. Step 2 Next, drill a clearance hole as near to the edge as you can in a part of the board that’s not damaged. Then put a screw in the hole and screw it down tightly, checking that it sits below the surface. Step 3 If you can see the screw head above the surface, take it out, countersink the hole (so the head doesn’t stick out) and screw the board down again. Step 4 Still notice some squeaks after fixing the boards down again? Try sprinkling talcum powder along the joint and work it in with a knife. After a while, the annoying sound should stop.

Source: How to repair your floorboards | Help & Advice | DIY at B&Q